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anxiety attack and panic attacks
als95
Posted on January 18 2009 04:09 PM
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Im dyscaculic and I have social anxiety disorder. I so screwed up jk:]

!!!*AMANdA*!!!
 
RottieWoman
Posted on January 18 2009 07:26 PM
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Hi AMANdA!

We hear u ..........although we/I do not judge you -

while I know it's not the same, I am Shy in groups too
 
smithross
Posted on January 29 2009 01:00 PM
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There are some good resources out there. One I came across recently was on a lot of topics related to better living with hypnosis. You can sure give it a try. Here is the link http://www.better...romo.html. I also noticed that they are offering a free mp3.
 
justfoundout
Posted on January 29 2009 03:06 PM
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1/29/09
According to the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology: "Its (hypnotism's) history is inextricably interwoven with occultism." There is danger in submitting oneself to hypnosis or self-hypnosis. It is not harmless. In the Bible, Christians are urged to keep control over their own behavior.

http://www.watcht...cle_01.htm

Also, advertising is not allowed on this forum. - justfoundout
 
RottieWoman
Posted on January 29 2009 04:43 PM
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I agree with the advertising.

But I do think hypnosis can be helpful, depending on the qualifications of the person in charge and if the client has done research on it and thinks it would be appropriate for them. It can also be dangerous. Like so many things, there are both sides.

I am a Jewish pagan Smile
 
undazzled
Posted on January 29 2009 07:44 PM
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The history of hypnotism may be interwoven with that of the occult, but I don't think it's an occult practice. Rather than calling on supposed spirits, the goal of hypnotism is to delve into your own repressed psyche and "dig up" things that you've hidden from yourself. It doesn't use a medium through which to achieve these goals, only the submersion into yourself.

It's also worth pointing out that Judeo-Christian religion's roots are in the polytheistic religions of ancient Assyria and Babylon, with a moderate influence from Zoroastrianism. Christmas and Easter (two major Christian holidays) both borrow pagan themes in their celebration. The Christmas tree and wreath were originally pagan symbols of the winter solstice, and the egg and rabbit associated with modern-day Easter celebrations (albeit separated from the actual religious aspect of the holiday) are deeply rooted in pagan fertility rituals.

Rottie, my curiosity is piqued - how is it that someone can be a Jewish pagan? Smile
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
justfoundout
Posted on January 29 2009 09:48 PM
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1/29/09
Dear RottieWoman,
I think you were joking about the 'pagan' part, weren't you? And, some of the Scriptures against all forms of spiritism are found in the book of Deuteronomy, written by Moises (long predating the birth and life of Jesus),... lest I leave out this important part.

And, Kat, you have extensive (and very correct) knowledge of the subject on which you write. I'm extremely and favorably impressed. And due to those very points that you mention (i.e., the pagen roots of those celebrations), I don't celebrate either Christmas or Easter. However, I do celebrate Christ's death, which falls on Nisan 14th, by the Jewish calendar.
- Jus'
Edited by justfoundout on January 29 2009 10:13 PM
 
RottieWoman
Posted on January 30 2009 01:31 AM
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Hi all,
<below try to read w/open mind>

yes u are correct, CheshireKat many of today's monotheist practices originally came from pagan roots and were modified to entice people to become Christian while at the same time still retaining a bit of pagan "flavor". I agree you have very good knowledge Smile

and nope,I wasn't joking. As Judaism is a culture,a heritage and a people - the Jews - one can be culturally Jewish <culture being a set of customs, language, foods, myths/stories, ways of expression and interaction...> and still be non-religious. Among my extended family as well as other Jewish people I know atheist Jews, Buddhist Jews and so on. My parents allowed me to choose as a child if I wanted to do anything with religious/institutional Judaism, and, if I desired to believe in any deity. I chose neither and they didn't force it because they didn't want me to associate Judaism with being forced to believe something or go worship somewhere and then turn away as soon as I was 18, and refuse to have anything to do with it - as was my husband's experience <he was raised Catholic> . So I got to follow my own way and went back to it later. That is fairly common in Jewish households.

To attempt brevity:
I lean toward atheism but do not call myself an atheist. I do not follow the male-dominated monotheism of Judaism but instead believe in many spirits, many forces residing in all; everything carries spirit. From my perspective there is no "God". My favorite Jewish holidays are the harvest festivals, which are more nature-oriented. I talk to the Mother Earth, the divine feminine, Shekhina. I call the Directions - North, South, East and West..........

Smile
 
Dulcy
Posted on February 04 2009 01:38 PM
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Geez, the spammers aren't even trying to disguise themselves anymore.
"Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?"
The Summer Day by Mary Oliver
 
http://www.fivedollarmail.blogspot.com/
Lostinspatial
Posted on February 04 2009 02:58 PM
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Why would anyone have to be joking about the Pagan part? It's a belief system just as Judaism or Christianity or Islam or Buddhism are. And one that's unfairly gotten a bad rap. Paganism is entirely different than Satanism.

An overview of the wide variety of beliefs included within Paganism:

http://en.wikiped...i/Paganism

I was raised Catholic (not religious as an adult) and I've read up a bit about Pagan beliefs, but still don't know a lot about them. I find the Wiccan Rule of 3 to be especially interesting & relevant. It's sort of like the Golden Rule, but it encompasses not only action, but thought/wishes as well:

http://en.wikiped...e_(Wiccan)
Edited by Lostinspatial on February 04 2009 02:59 PM
 
undazzled
Posted on February 04 2009 04:24 PM
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Rottie - That's really interesting. Judaism as a cultural system is such a concept to me, because having been raised very Baptist (and still a faithful Christian today) the idea that you can separate two parts of what seems like a whole "unit" of faith is basically unheard of. I always assumed Jewish people were operating within a singular cultural AND religious sphere, not two that could be separated, until I went to college and got me some education about it. Smile

Obviously in Christianity you can't be "culturally Christian" and not believe in the Trinity - you have to go whole hog with it, or it's not really Christianity. You can't pick and choose, so the "picking and choosing" aspect of Judaism is really curious to me. (I love comparative religion, and I'm working towards my degree in anthropology, so this is what happens when you mix the two together LOL).

Christianity in many circles gets a terrible rap. It really hurts my heart when I see people who think Christianity is a bigoted, prejudicial, hateful religion based on political acts made by people who call themselves Christian but whose actions don't reflect any of the Christian values (of love, respect, tolerance, etc.)

People see radicals in the news burning down abortion clinics and throwing Bibles at people on the street and all that nonsense... even in the Bible, this kind of behavior was deemed unacceptable by those propagating the Christian faith. Heck, Jesus hung out with tax collectors and prostitutes and considered them his brothers and sisters, and you never see him railing on them in the scripture. He lead by example; he taught in parables, and not once did he come straight out and say, "I am the Messiah, listen to me, damn it!" With him, it was an open door - if you wanted to listen, fine, come and listen, and if not, he wasn't going to shove it down your throat. If Jesus didn't shove his message down people's throats, what gives any modern-day Christian the right to do the same? It really, really frustrates me.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
Lostinspatial
Posted on February 04 2009 06:08 PM
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CheshireKat wrote:
Rottie - That's really interesting. Judaism as a cultural system is such a concept to me, because having been raised very Baptist (and still a faithful Christian today) the idea that you can separate two parts of what seems like a whole "unit" of faith is basically unheard of. I always assumed Jewish people were operating within a singular cultural AND religious sphere, not two that could be separated, until I went to college and got me some education about it. Smile

Obviously in Christianity you can't be "culturally Christian" and not believe in the Trinity - you have to go whole hog with it, or it's not really Christianity. You can't pick and choose, so the "picking and choosing" aspect of Judaism is really curious to me. (I love comparative religion, and I'm working towards my degree in anthropology, so this is what happens when you mix the two together LOL).


Well, I can't speak for Rottie, but I grew up in an area that was primarily Catholic & Jewish, with some other faiths mixed in. From how it's been explained to me, the geographic boundaries changed so often in parts of Eastern Europe, that many Jewish people chose to identify as Jewish rather than a particular country. And unlike the Christians in those areas, they had a shared experience of oppression (e.g. pogroms) regardless of how religious/observant they were. So it can be both an ethnic/cultural identity as well as a religious identity.

Also, like Christianity, there are subgroups within. Please pardon any errors I may have made, but from my understanding there's Orthodox Judaism (strict adherence to keeping kosher, dress, etc.). Then there's Conservative Judaism (less strict, but still keeps kosher, observes certain dress codes. And Reform Judaism which is more lenient on dietary and dress and will recognize converts more readily. And there are subgroups within even some of those.

In the NYC area, there are klezmer bands which mix klezmer music with more modern forms (rap, alternative, reggae). Some of the fans are religious, some not. Hamantashen (a pastry with fruit inside) and latkes are readily available in NYC. A person can be a fan of klezmer hybrid bands and like latkes and hamantashen without being religious or even Jewish.

From the Catholic perspective, I'm probably what most folks would consider a "lapsed" Catholic in that I don't go to mass or regularly participate in the sacraments of confession or communion. Yet, I still celebrate Christmas, Easter and St. Patrick's Day in there more secular senses with my family. So I would say I'm culturally Christian/Catholic, if not religiously so. Which of course, wouldn't be recognized by the Church, but doesn't change the fact that I participate in some cultural aspects of the observances.
Edited by Lostinspatial on February 04 2009 06:15 PM
 
undazzled
Posted on February 07 2009 11:53 PM
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Lostinspatial wrote:
From how it's been explained to me, the geographic boundaries changed so often in parts of Eastern Europe, that many Jewish people chose to identify as Jewish rather than a particular country. And unlike the Christians in those areas, they had a shared experience of oppression (e.g. pogroms) regardless of how religious/observant they were. So it can be both an ethnic/cultural identity as well as a religious identity.

From the Catholic perspective, I'm probably what most folks would consider a "lapsed" Catholic in that I don't go to mass or regularly participate in the sacraments of confession or communion. Yet, I still celebrate Christmas, Easter and St. Patrick's Day in there more secular senses with my family. So I would say I'm culturally Christian/Catholic, if not religiously so. Which of course, wouldn't be recognized by the Church, but doesn't change the fact that I participate in some cultural aspects of the observances.


It wasn't as much the fact that boundaries were changing as it was that the entire cultural identity of the Jewish people is based on the recurring theme of "exile and return" in their history. The book of Exodus is a perfect example of the theme (exile into Egypt where they were enslaved, then their liberation and return to the promised land), and it repeats itself throughout Jewish history.

Exile from Babylon, the fall of the Temple, the Crusades (in which Jews were "lumped in" with Muslims as being infidels) sanctuary in Spain, the Inquisition... Jews have spent the past several thousand years being alternatively expelled and then briefly tolerated. The most recent example of "exile and return" in Jewish history was the Holocaust, followed by the creation of the Jewish state Israel. They always come in pairs - the exile, then the 'return'. This is one of the reasons political Zionists believe so strongly in their cause - they believe history proves that the Jewish people will NEVER be accepted anywhere, and their only hope is to create their own state where they can exist in peace.

I suppose celebrating the traditionally Christian holidays could be an example of cultural Christianity, but I take issue with the secularity of these holidays in modern society. When one celebrates Christmas not as a religious holiday but as a secular one, there is no emphasis on the Christian roots of the holiday (like there is emphasis or at least acknowledgment of the Jewish roots of cultural Judaism).

If you ask someone celebrating "secular Christmas" what it's all about, they're more likely to say "Santa Claus" than "baby Jesus". To me, that doesn't reflect a cultural Christianity, but the integration and degradation of what was once religious into something commercial. I suppose it comes in "gradients" of religious acknowledgment, but I think it's obvious that society's broader view of "Christmas" today is a secular, commercial one, and not a religious one. Hell, when you've got people calling it a "holiday tree" and demonizing those of us who dare to say "Merry Christmas" instead of "Happy Holidays", I think it's obvious just where religion stands in the issue.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
RottieWoman
Posted on February 09 2009 09:51 PM
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yes u are correct in the subgroups, LIS....also Jewish atheists, Jewish UU's, Jews who are not Zionist as well as Jews who are, Jewish pagans such as myself and Jewish Renewal which would be the institutional branch I would be involved in if there was a Renewal synagogue where I am. Jewish Renewal, unlike the others, is not an official segment or type of Jewish practice with a overriding body <like the Union of Reform Judaism is with Reform> but more like a combination path utilizing elements of many areas of Judaism as well as feminism and ecology.

Yes much of the identity of the Jewish people is based on this "survival" idea and one of the criticisms or comments going around in Jewish circles today is how we as a people can identify as Jews, remember the Shoah and everything else but not have so much of a group-think of "survival"; that our collective identity shouldn't be based so much on persecution.

Good Luck with your degree in Anthro, CheshireKat - you sound like you have much to offer Smile How did u get interested in that field?
 
Lostinspatial
Posted on February 09 2009 10:37 PM
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Thanks for the info RottieWoman.

CheshireKat wrote:
Hell, when you've got people calling it a "holiday tree" and demonizing those of us who dare to say "Merry Christmas" instead of "Happy Holidays", I think it's obvious just where religion stands in the issue.


I'd hardly say those who "dare to say Merry Christmas" are demonized. I've never had someone who didn't celebrate get offended if I wished them a Merry Christmas. I did get one of those "Christmas warrior" types who berated me for saying "Happy Holidays" (it was a work situation and I didn't know which holiday she celebrated, so I went generic). I've forgotten and referred to the office Holiday Party as the Christmas Party in front of those who don't celebrate and they have not been offended.

Not to mention, Christmas is the only Federally recognized holiday which is a religious one. And we work on a calendar consistent with Christian dates, so Easter falls on a Sunday when many people are already off. In contrast, when I see Jewish friends have to use personal days for Yom Kippur or Muslim friends use them for Eid al Fitr, it's hard to take the "War on Christmas" types seriously.

As someone who isn't religious, I still choose to celebrate Christmas, Easter & St. Patrick's Day because those have social and cultural meaning in my family and among many of my circle of friends. I don't think doing so "degrades" the holiday. It's just that it has different meaning to different people. As has been previously noted, many of the traditions originated from pre-Christian cultures.

Now, if I'm in church for a wedding, christening or a funeral, I don't take communion. I don't meet the requirements (going to confession regularly, etc.) so I don't take communion out of respect for the faith. It causes some tension in my family & some relatives have said I should do so to keep the peace. But IMO, disrespecting the ground rules would be degrading the faith, not putting up a Christmas tree and drinking eggnog with the folks.
Edited by Lostinspatial on February 09 2009 10:47 PM
 
undazzled
Posted on February 10 2009 12:43 AM
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LIS - I think your points about the other religious holidays are very valid. I know at my university at the beginning of each semester, they put out a mailer that essentially says, "If you celebrate non-Christian holidays that conflict with the syllabus in any of your classes, let your professor know, because they are required to excuse you without penalty for that day." None of the professors bother to look up the non-Christian holidays, so it falls on the student to arrange their excused absences.

At the same time, religion is a PERSONAL thing, so I don't understand why them having to use their PERSONAL days at work to take off for religious observances is so egregious. While our nation is a secular one, 1/3 of the world's population identifies themselves as Christian to some degree, so it makes sense that Christian holidays would be more widely practiced and, therefore, accommodated for. Think about how many people would call in on Christmas if it wasn't a federal holiday - it's much more practical to just close shop for the day.

Also, when towns and cities pass laws against religious displays during the Christmas season, when they rename it the "holiday tree" to avoid "offending" anyone, when they essentially wipe away the original intent of the holiday as a religious one... I consider that a "war on Christmas." You don't hear anyone out there crying out, "Don't call it a menorah! Call it a holiday candelabra! We don't want to offend anybody with this piece of religious iconography." Nobody cares if you put statues of the Maccabees or a giant menorah in your front yard, but there are areas where nativity scenes are BANNED from display. There's a serious double standard there, and it works against Christians.

I think you misunderstood what I meant by "degrades" the holiday. I don't think that people celebrating in general degrades it - I love parties, the more the merrier. I just think the real meaning of Christmas (celebrating the birth of Jesus) has been steamrolled over by capitalist agendas. Commercialism is the new God, it seems, in America, and people are uncomfortable remembering the actual REASON they started buying the big screen TVs and nice clothes and gift cards for each other. It's turned into a rat race, into "keeping up with the Jones's"... who gets a bigger Christmas, which correlates directly with who has greater credit card debt.

Rottie - Thank you. Smile You're actually going to laugh when I tell you how I got into this field... Bones. The icon I have over on the left, under my screen name? It's from the show Bones. I have been in love with it for years, and the main character is a forensic anthropologist. When I first started watching the show I had no idea what anthropology even was, so I started doing some Googling. One thing lead to another, and I realized that real-life anthropology was even cooler than the anthropology used in the show. As soon as I got into college I started with a General Anthro. class, and I was gone hook, line, and sinker. Smile My particular area of interest is linguistic anthropology, although I'm still trying to get a good feel for biological. We'll see where it goes.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
Lostinspatial
Posted on February 10 2009 12:53 AM
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Yes there are logistical issues due to the number of people who celebrate Christmas. But then Christians can't claim a "War on Christmas" when they get the ONLY federally recognized holiday in the USA. In a country which has an amendment SPECIFICALLY dedicated to not establishing a religion:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;


http://www.gpoacc...con012.pdf

And I really don't understand your reasoning that it's ok for non-Christians to have to use personal days to observe their religious celebrations while being ok with a federally observed Christmas Day holiday. Either it's personal for EVERYONE or everyone should get a set number of days for observance of holy days.

CheshireKat wrote:
Nobody cares if you put statues of the Maccabees or a giant menorah in your front yard, but there are areas where nativity scenes are BANNED from display. There's a serious double standard there, and it works against Christians.


Please provide examples/links where nativity scenes were banned from private property such as front yards, That would appear to be a violation of the free exercise thereof part of the First Amendment and I'd like to know more about it. Has it been challenged in court?

Some more on the pre-Christian history of the holiday:
http://www.holida.../story.htm
Edited by Lostinspatial on February 10 2009 01:09 AM
 
undazzled
Posted on February 10 2009 01:54 AM
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Lostinspatial wrote:
And I really don't understand your reasoning that it's ok for non-Christians to have to use personal days to observe their religious celebrations while being ok with a federally observed Christmas Day holiday. Either it's personal for EVERYONE or everyone should get a set number of days for observance of holy days.


The "Christmas" that is federally observed and celebrated nationwide is hardly a religious observance in today's secular America - it is a commercial one. The "Christmas" that EVERYONE gets a day off for (not just Christians, it's an equal-opportunity freebie) is essentially an empty holiday, one where we all sit around and open presents and don't think about Jesus or God or the gift of everlasting life.

And that's my point, that's why it's okay for Christmas to be a federally observed holiday - not only does it have the support of the masses (Christianity far overshadows Islam and Judaism in the United States), but it's not as if this is being celebrated as a religious experience anyway. When a Jew takes off for Yom Kippur, it's not a nation-wide commercial experience - it's strictly a religious observation.

By the way, thank you for the information, I'm actually well aware that we ripped much of the celebratory aspect from the Pagans in order to make Christianity more appealing and the conversion of the Holy Roman Empire easier. The point is, now we're using it to celebrate Jesus's birth, so HOW we picked that day doesn't really matter. It's that we celebrate it, and many Christians in the United States still DO use the holiday to celebrate and remember the birth of our Savior and the gift of Life, but it has not remained a federally observed holiday for that purpose. It's federally observed because it has commercial value.

Lostinspatial wrote:
Please provide examples/links where nativity scenes were banned from private property such as front yards, That would appear to be a violation of the free exercise thereof part of the First Amendment and I'd like to know more about it. Has it been challenged in court?


It's not a matter of banning the creche on private property--legally you can't do that--but on public property. (I know, my fault on the wording; by "in your front yard" my point was that you can publicly display Jewish iconography without getting flack, but you're judged for Christian displays.) There are multiple examples nation-wide of the menorah or the star of David being put on display in public arenas, while the creche is not allowed. Here are a few:

http://www.nytime....html?_r=1

http://www.worldn...E_ID=41743

http://query.nyti...A9649C8B63

I really don't give a flying reindeer if Jews want to display menorahs and stars of David on public property, as long as it is right alongside the Christmas tree (Christmas, not "holiday" tree) and more importantly, the nativity scene. You can't ban one without banning all, or allow one without allowing all.
Edited by undazzled on February 10 2009 05:05 AM
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
TwilightObsessed
Posted on March 20 2009 07:10 PM
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Hey all Grin, Im not sure if mines is panic attacks or what but i do it alot. Most of the time when im in class in maths and the teacher askes me to work with numbers i get confused and she doesnt understand fully what dyscalculia is and makes me feel like an idot and i feel like im being pressured like the other day she started shouting at me beacuse i couldnt do the fractions and then i burst into tears and couldnt breathe and i was shouting at her but im not sure if thats panic attacks or what??

Siri x
 
undazzled
Posted on March 21 2009 05:25 AM
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Siri - I don't think what you're having is a panic attack, but it's definitely a very emotional reaction to the immense stress your teacher is putting you under! I'm sorry that your teacher yells at you and belittles you like that, that's horrible of her - she's an educator, she's supposed to HELP you, not hurt you.

While the symptoms of a panic attack differ for every individual, they usually include the same core symptoms. This includes an intense feeling of overwhelming anxiety, that completely takes over your thoughts. You might fear that something terrible is about to happen, even if you can't put your finger on what it is you're afraid of. Your thoughts race, and you may feel an intense rush of adrenaline, your "fight or flight" response.

Physical symptoms often associated with panic attacks include a rapid heart rate, hyperventilating, tightness in the chest (feeling like you can't get enough air), sweaty palms, chills, feeling like you're about to pass out, nausea/digestive upset, trembling, etc. Basically all of the things you might feel if you were anxious about something (like a test or performing in front of a crowd) but hugely intensified. It is truly what the name implies, an attack of panic on your senses, physical and mental.

Some people with dyscalculia might develop severe anxiety in "math" situations where they are required to deal with numbers or utilize their mathematical skills (or lack thereof), because they have been ridiculed for their ineptness and yelled at their whole lives. Anxiety is a very real part of dyscalculia, because it can make a person perform even more poorly than they might otherwise, because they are so keyed up from their anxiety that they can't think straight.

If anxiety is a major part of your math problems, talk to your teacher about it. Tell her that her behavior is making you even more anxious about your poor math skills, and is not helping and possibly hindering your performance. Hopefully she will listen, and if not, you might go to another math teacher at your school, or a higher-up administrator about it. Don't let your anxiety and her poor behavior stand in the way of doing the best you can!
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
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