The Dyscalculia Forum
April 17 2014 03:53 AM

Navigation

Login

Username

Password



Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.

Forum Threads

Member Poll

Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





You must login to vote.

Users Online

· Guests Online: 7

· Members Online: 0

· Total Members: 6,048
· Newest Member: Nicki Holmes

View Thread

 Print Thread
how to count change without a calculator
ShotgunOpera
#1 Print Post
Posted on November 12 2008 04:36 PM
User Avatar

Member

Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 26

Joined: 2008-11-12

ok, so this is kinda silly, but it's actually pretty helpful. at my place of work, we have no actual register, just a box, and a calculator that floats anywhere from the front to the back office. anyway, i found this page online and found it to be VERY helpful, and now i no longer have to use the calculator to give back change!

http://www.wikiho...Out-Change

i hope this helps, i know it did for me. Smile
Edited by Countess on November 13 2008 03:30 PM
do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy and taste good with ketchup...
 
http://therewalksalady.livejournal.com
my3angels65
#2 Print Post
Posted on December 29 2008 07:50 PM
Member

Location: No value
Posts: 7

Joined: 2008-12-26

Thanks for sharing this article. I didn't realize I had difficulty counting out change until I got my first job as a 16 year old. I worked with my mother at a drugstore.

She was able to do most of her math in her head, so apparently I didn't get this condition from her. But when she realized my difficulty counting out change, she sat me down at home and taught me how to count it exactly this way by going in reverse to equal the amount given.

I still count it out like this to this day.
 
twistedxkiss
#3 Print Post
Posted on December 30 2008 01:29 AM
Member

Location: Michigan
Posts: 555

Joined: 2008-09-19

This is the way I was taught to do it in school, in 4th grade my teacher had to take me aside and give me special lessons because I couldn't understand it. This was when my math issues became obvious to me. I didn't actually learn how to do it until I got a cashier job at 18. Counting is my nemesis so far as dyscalculia is concerned, it's probably what I am worst at.
 
downtown
#4 Print Post
Posted on June 26 2010 02:07 AM
User Avatar

Member

Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 20

Joined: 2007-05-11

That's great because it gives you step by step instructions. I've been practicing with this game:

http://www.funbra...index.html

It gives you amounts and you click on the coins and bills you need to to make the change. You can also choose your type of currency by clicking on your country's flag.
 
justfoundout
#5 Print Post
Posted on June 26 2010 01:52 PM
Member

Location: Texas USA
Posts: 6295

Joined: 2008-05-25

6/26/10
Thanks for that link, downtown. I'm in the US, but I played with the Australian money. They have a 20 cent piece,... isn't that cute? - jus'
 
downtown
#6 Print Post
Posted on June 28 2010 12:10 AM
User Avatar

Member

Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 20

Joined: 2007-05-11

I haven't tried other currency yet. I just now got the hang of ours! Pfft
 
justfoundout
#7 Print Post
Posted on June 28 2010 12:33 AM
Member

Location: Texas USA
Posts: 6295

Joined: 2008-05-25

6/27/10
I lived in South America for many years. There, I had to learn to use the local currency, but worse yet, I had to learn what it was worth in US currency, as their rate kept changing, and changing, and changing. So, I got lots of practice, whether I liked it or not. - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on June 28 2010 12:34 AM
 
pookyisme
#8 Print Post
Posted on July 22 2012 12:15 PM
Member

Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 6

Joined: 2011-12-18

After much thought, I have decided this is the only thing that I want to try to improve (I think focusing on too many things will just discourage me) - I want to be able to calculate change so that I know how much is owed me. I tried the method ShotgunOpera posted - but it just doesn't make sense to me. When I logically try to think through how its possible to do ...I come up with the following - 1. counting upwards (as shotgun posted) 2. normal subtraction in head (this doesn't work cause the numbers disappeared.) 3. maybe some sort of base 10 method? (which I don't completely understand either). Does anyone have any concrete ideas? As I said, this is my only goal at the moment, but I want to work hard to achieve this and finally work out how to do it. I know there is a bit of anxiety involved as well - people in the line behind you. You have about 5 seconds to work out 1. what the change is supposed to be 2. Were you actually given that change. So can't really sit there all day working out. But I really want to be able to do this!
 
justfoundout
#9 Print Post
Posted on July 22 2012 08:14 PM
Member

Location: Texas USA
Posts: 6295

Joined: 2008-05-25

7/22/12
Hi pookyisme,
Nice to meet you. We have a dyscalculic forum member in Brisbane. Her name is Kathy. I hope that she will come along soon, and will have some ideas for you. I wouldn't mind learning about Australian money, but I would be learning it along with you.

With American money, I'm able to visualize a 'proportion' and not just a numerical percentage. Thinking in terms of 'proportion' helps me not loose track of the worth of the money that I'm manipulating. A 'quarter' means 1/4th of something. Four of them (quarters) makes a 'whole'. Since a 'dollar' has 100 cents, then a 'quarter' is 1/4th of a 100, and it takes four of them to make a dollar.

I would have to take a look at Australian money again to come up with something that you might like regarding 'proportions', done Australian-style. Get back to me on this if you want to keep talking about it? - jus'
 
TeaGeekNZ
#10 Print Post
Posted on August 21 2012 01:00 PM
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Zealand
Posts: 2

Joined: 2012-08-21

Wow, this method is super confusing. If I had to seriously stand there and count while they waited, it would take forever while I sweated and double-checked the amounts.

Luckily our money here in New Zealand starts at 10c, then 20c, 50c, $1 & $2 coins, then notes from five upwards. This makes it so easy. Plus I don't see them as numbers, I visualise it almost like tetris blocks, where I know certain amounts have corresponding patterns of notes and coins that I've learnt to match quickly.
 
pookyisme
#11 Print Post
Posted on August 26 2012 04:40 AM
Member

Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 6

Joined: 2011-12-18

justfoundout, australian money is the same as what what teageek has described except we also have a 5c piece. Proportions have never really meant any sense to me...I found myself the other day trying to do a recipe that called for 1/4 cup and I didn't have a 1/4 measure and wondered what I would do. I do have a cup measure. That was when I realised that proportions mean nothing to me. But anyway, I guess maybe the better question is to justfoundout and teageek...what was it that helped you find your answer to being able to calculate change? I am looking for my own answer as it seems that nobody elses' really make sense to me. What made the penny drop for you ? (hehe excuse my pun).
 
justfoundout
#12 Print Post
Posted on August 27 2012 07:31 PM
Member

Location: Texas USA
Posts: 6295

Joined: 2008-05-25

8/27/12
Hi pookyisme,
Okay. Go to the link that 'downtown' gave us and choose Australian money.
http://www.funbra...bin/cr.cgi
Here's the problem that's showing for me right now, so I'll work on this one:
Amount of Sale: $0.35
Amount Paid: $1.00

The idea is to chisel away whatever is in excess above the amount of 35 cents. A dollar is what the other person has handed you. You can safely say that if you give them 50 cents, you won't have given them too much, since there are 'two' 50 cent pieces in a dollar, and yet, you know that 35 cents is even less than 50 cents. So, I'm putting a '1' in the box beside the 50 cent piece in the game.

Now, we only have to concern ourselves with the fact that 35 cents is still smaller than 50 cents, and that the 'customer' isn't going to leave until we have satisfied his sense of fairness. He needs for us to give him the amount that is in excess of 35 cents, but we'll make sure that he only gets the difference between that 35 cents and the 50 cents that we are carving down from. So, <scratching head> I'm now going to count up from 35 cents to 50 cents. 35 plus 10 is 45, and 45 is only 5 short of being 50. I'm putting a '1' in the box beside the 10 cent piece and a '1' in the box beside the 5 cent piece, and I'm hitting the 'go' button on the game. Voila! I'm brilliant. Those were the coins that I should give to the customer. A 50 cent piece, a 10 cent piece, and a 5 cent piece.

I read a great book yesterday, pookyisme. It's called Rabbit Proof Fence. It says that the Western Australia aboriginese (at least one particular tribe) didn't used to bother with math at all. Must have been nice. - jus'
 
Jump to Forum:

Similar Threads

Thread Forum Replies Last Post
calculator app for dyscalculics Dyscalculia Chat 5 March 04 2014 09:05 PM
17 and I still count on my fingers Introduce Yourself 11 February 25 2014 05:27 AM
grade calculator online Education 1 December 17 2013 12:45 AM
Calculator WooHoo Dyscalculia Chat 14 August 28 2013 08:06 PM
calculator problem Introduce Yourself 3 August 25 2012 09:58 AM