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Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





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What are reading right now?
carolineinoz
#41 Print Post
Posted on January 19 2009 08:23 PM
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Currently reading the Iris Murdoch classic, The Sea The Sea.
Before that I read The Slap, by Christos Tsiolkas. If you want to read a contemporary Aussie novelist, then Christos might be your writer. His writing is sometimes considered controversial, graphic and somewhat depressing...personally I couldnt put the book down.
 
evie dee 2
#42 Print Post
Posted on January 20 2009 10:07 PM
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KNitting under the Influence-Claire Lebazneck
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on February 01 2009 12:45 AM
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Today I went to the public library and picked up Salinger's "Franny and Zooey" for a Creative Writing class I'm taking. It's pretty good so far, which I'm grateful for because I read "Catcher in the Rye" and absolutely hated it. I was afraid I'd hate this one too, but it's looking good so far.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
evie dee 2
#44 Print Post
Posted on February 02 2009 09:27 PM
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Toxic Parents by Susan Forward. I'm already three chapters into it, and so far, it's right on the money with my situation.
 
Disastra
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Posted on March 04 2009 02:20 PM
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Wreckage by Niall Griffiths very gritty but beautifully written. Blamo if you liked Trainspotting and it's ilk then you may enjoy this author.

Before that was Don't Cry For Me Aberystwyth by Malcom Pryce. It's Welsh Crime Noir, darkly comic and probably an aquired taste.

I have to admit to also being amazed when I go into someone's home and there's not a book in sight. We are only able to use half the width of our stairs as they've become a makeshift bookshelf all the way up, and that's with being ruthless and only keeping the books we just can't bear to part with.
I once had a partner, not for very long and you'll see why when I tell you that he asked me to stop reading whilst he watched television as "the turning of the pages disturbed him."
If life hands you a ruled notebook, write the other way around.
 
RottieWoman
#46 Print Post
Posted on March 04 2009 03:12 PM
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I have several books I am reading at the same time - some borrowed from my mom such as several Jewish-themed books, and also some dog training books and a new little booklet I just got to go with some new weights I purchased.
 
CheshireKat
#47 Print Post
Posted on March 04 2009 03:46 PM
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Disastra wrote:
I once had a partner, not for very long and you'll see why when I tell you that he asked me to stop reading whilst he watched television as "the turning of the pages disturbed him."


Oh gosh I see what you mean... yeah that guy would be out the door! My ex was not a big reader... in fact I think the only thing he ever read was Cabela's magazine, lol. It was one of the many reasons we did not work out.

Within the past 2 weeks I have finished "Franny and Zooey" by Salinger, and "Falling Leaves" by Adeline Yen Mah. Both were great books, especially Falling Leaves. It's the "memoir of an unwanted Chinese daughter" and that really sums it up perfectly. It's so raw and inspiring... it really makes you rethink "how bad" your life is.

Now in addition to my school books (of which there are many), I am reading "All My Kin" by Carol Strack. Strack is an anthropologist who did a several-year study in a black midwestern ghetto on kinship bonds and poverty within the community. The book is all about her study and her experiences during said study, and I find it so wildly interesting, I can barely make myself put it down to do the things I NEED to do.

I am one of those people who has a stack of books "in the wings" waiting to be read. Right now I've got a pile of about 6 "unread" books on my bookshelf, just itching for me to read them. I'm glad my spring break is coming up because I intend to do just that!
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
RottieWoman
#48 Print Post
Posted on March 04 2009 05:32 PM
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I have a "yet-to-be-read" pile too Smile
 
evie dee 2
#49 Print Post
Posted on March 06 2009 12:51 AM
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I'm currently reading Girl, Interrupted by Susan Kaysen. The chapters are three pages long, and it's really good!
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on March 06 2009 01:15 AM
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evie dee 2 wrote:
I'm currently reading Girl, Interrupted by Susan Kaysen. The chapters are three pages long, and it's really good!


I lovelovelovelovelove that book. It defined my 9th grade year. The movie is also amazing, but movies never beat the books they're made from.

You might also try reading "Prozac Nation" by Elizabeth Wurtzel if you end up liking Girl Interrupted.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
justfoundout
#51 Print Post
Posted on March 06 2009 03:16 AM
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3/5/09
For my Springbreak, I get to do a 150 question 'take home' test for Business Law II. The teacher gave the class a 'choice', and the 'take home' test was what the loudest ones chose. I didn't understand the options well enough to try to 'vote', but I hope that the 'take home' test will fix my sagging grade,... even though it will be at the expense of having any fun at all. - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on March 06 2009 03:17 AM
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on March 06 2009 02:02 PM
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Jus, you remind me of an older gentleman I have in my Archaeology class. He is probably in his late 40s or early 50s, and he's a very nice guy but a little clueless as to what's going on technology-wise, LOL. So whenever we have to do something online for class (like access the online course reserves for readings, etc.) he very politely asks our TA to explain step-by-step the process to get to the online location, because he actually lived in a time before computers, unlike the rest of us. I have never actually touched a book from my school's library the entire time I've been there - everything we need to read is scanned into an online database and we just access the course reserve and read it that way.

Good luck on your take-home exam. Those tend to be more difficult because you have all of your notes/books in front of you, but at the same time you have the potential to get a 100 if you put enough effort into it, which is always a great grade booster. Smile
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
evie dee 2
#53 Print Post
Posted on March 06 2009 10:17 PM
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CheshireKat wrote:
evie dee 2 wrote:
I'm currently reading Girl, Interrupted by Susan Kaysen. The chapters are three pages long, and it's really good!


I lovelovelovelovelove that book. It defined my 9th grade year. The movie is also amazing, but movies never beat the books they're made from.

You might also try reading "Prozac Nation" by Elizabeth Wurtzel if you end up liking Girl Interrupted.

THanks!
 
justfoundout
#54 Print Post
Posted on March 06 2009 11:18 PM
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3/6/09
Dear Kat,
Somehow, Archaeology seems like a good place for the 'older gentleman' to be. He probably gets the best grades since he was alive during much of the archeological process! That was what happened to me in my American Government class a couple of years ago. Since Am Gov is a required class for almost any program, most of the people in the class didn't want to be there, so there were a handful of smart students and they rest would have lain on the floor asleep if they could have been sure they'd wake up when it was time to leave. Anyway, the teacher (who was also much younger than me) would ask, "Which President's family had a peanut farm, and in what State?" I'd raise my hand and say, "Jimmy Carter, Georgia." On most of the questions, no one would raise their hand, and nobody would look at the teacher, because they didn't want to get called on. Then I knew I was 'special' the day that the teacher asked a question,... and no one flinched a muscle, but then he called on me anyway even though I didn't have my hand up and I wasn't looking at him! And I got it right! I guess that he thought he was 'onto something' because he did this almost every class after that. Since I don't remember reading a single page in the book, other than what we read out loud in class, I can only summize that I got my 'A' by having been alive during such a large portion of American History,... the time line, not the class..

Now RE: The Internet, I have had some trouble accessing certain college sites, but actually I took Basic Computer Literacy in 1991, and COSC 1300 in 2007 (P.P., Excel, Word, and Outlook) and got 'A's both times. So, I think that most of my computer befuddlement is more dyscalculia based than age based. But only you guys here on the forum would probably believe this. Wink - jus'

P.S. Oh, hey! I just learned a new 'emoticon' in my psychology class. Here it is. ( ::[ ]:: ) Can you see it okay? It's a band-aid! For giving comfort. Only here, on this forum, if you don't put that extra space before the parenthesis, the 'program' throws an extra smiley face in, which, if I'm not mistaken, really would confuse the person who you are intending to 'console'.
Edited by justfoundout on March 06 2009 11:39 PM
 
Disastra
#55 Print Post
Posted on March 07 2009 09:11 AM
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There is a constant 'to be read next' pile here too. I can't bear the thought of finishing a book and there not being another in the wings.

If life hands you a ruled notebook, write the other way around.
 
evie dee 2
#56 Print Post
Posted on March 07 2009 09:24 PM
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Disastra wrote:
There is a constant 'to be read next' pile here too. I can't bear the thought of finishing a book and there not being another in the wings.

I have so many books in my reading pile! I buy most of my books at used bookstores, and the price can't be beat! I got a book that I"ve been wanting to read for $1.50!
 
CheshireKat
#57 Print Post
Posted on March 07 2009 09:54 PM
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evie dee 2 wrote:
I buy most of my books at used bookstores, and the price can't be beat! I got a book that I"ve been wanting to read for $1.50!


I love used bookstores; you just can't beat the price, and IMO the older a book is the more character it has.

I bought the book "Male and Female: A Study of the Sexes in a Changing World" by Margaret Mead (one of the biggest names in the field of anthropology) for fifty cents at the used book store last week. Fifty cents! The book is fairly old, from the 1960s, but Mead's studies were groundbreaking in her time and I think it will be an interesting read not only to gain a better understanding of the anthropological differences between the sexes cross-culturally up to the publishing date of the study, but also to read it in today's context. I'm just an anthro geek, is the moral of the story. Smile
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
evie dee 2
#58 Print Post
Posted on March 08 2009 04:06 PM
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CheshireKat wrote:
evie dee 2 wrote:
I buy most of my books at used bookstores, and the price can't be beat! I got a book that I"ve been wanting to read for $1.50!


I love used bookstores; you just can't beat the price, and IMO the older a book is the more character it has.

I bought the book "Male and Female: A Study of the Sexes in a Changing World" by Margaret Mead (one of the biggest names in the field of anthropology) for fifty cents at the used book store last week. Fifty cents! The book is fairly old, from the 1960s, but Mead's studies were groundbreaking in her time and I think it will be an interesting read not only to gain a better understanding of the anthropological differences between the sexes cross-culturally up to the publishing date of the study, but also to read it in today's context. I'm just an anthro geek, is the moral of the story. Smile

Neat!
 
Disastra
#59 Print Post
Posted on March 09 2009 02:05 PM
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Kat, Mead is quite unparalelled even today. That should indeed be an interesting read.

Yes, used or second-hand book shops are one of my favourite haunts, also charity shops. (I belive they're known as thrift shops in the US?). There's little to beat the thrill of picking up a book you've always wanted to read, or even a new discovery that seems interesting, for a pound or so.

I got a lovely edition last week; The Complete Plain Words by Sir Ernest Gowers, printed in 1954 and destined for members of the Civil Service and similar to try to encourage them to make letters to the public easily understandable.

Yes, I am, as my children would say, a bit of a 'geek.'
If life hands you a ruled notebook, write the other way around.
 
justfoundout
#60 Print Post
Posted on March 09 2009 04:00 PM
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3/9/09
This video has nothing to with dyscalculia, and I don't want to confuse any newbies by posting the link as a 'video', because they would expect it to be dyscalculia-related if they find it here on this forum.

Our Business Law II instructor had us watch this video, broken into two parts at the end of two different classes, after his lecture. I'm putting it here on the What are you reading? Thread because, since I'm in a Psychology class and a Business Law II class this semester,... this is all I get to read! There's no time for fun right now due to my work and my classes. The video is about people loosing their houses in the US, due to the financial collape here.

It's long (an hour and a half), but worth watching. - jus'
http://www.hulu.c...s-p1-so-i0

House of Cards
CNBC Originals
Season 1 : Ep. 13|1:31:10|
The Definitive Look At The Origins Of Today's Global Economic Crisis

And the site is called Hulu.com. There are also free movies and re-runs of TV shows on this site.
 
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