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Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





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Who Knows you have Dyscalclia
reverend blamo
#21 Print Post
Posted on December 22 2009 12:43 AM
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"Improvise, Adapt and Overcome to conquer adversity"

That statement served the Marines (US) well, maybe we should borrow it.
"I used to be disgusted, now I try to be amused..."
Elvis Costello
 
Sim75
#22 Print Post
Posted on December 23 2009 06:58 AM
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Its interesting how times have changed and many of you are so open about it which gives me something to think about, but its been my bad issues for so long it hard to put it out there.

To the person that was outed in college, I was in an Anthropology class when the professor asked me a simple math subtraction question in front of the class and I just could not get it, talk about embarrassment ,so I dropped the next day.
The professor was an older woman so I think she has passed away by now,so I never got a chance to go back and tell her off.

 
RottieWoman
#23 Print Post
Posted on December 23 2009 02:19 PM
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one thing that has helped me is that the LD is one of many parts of me that might be considered "different" - I've had to "come out" countless times as bisexual, as jewish, as pagan <although I do understand that with the pagan thing I chose to be that, unlike the others> so for me the LD isn't that big of a thing, it's not like, if it wasn't for the LD, something in me feels like I could "pass" or "be like everybody else" - because I couldn't.
 
reverend blamo
#24 Print Post
Posted on December 25 2009 12:44 AM
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Rottie makes a good point for many of us. I have been the weird kid, the hippy kid, the punk kid, the artist, the scary guy, so coming out as a person with LDs isn't that unusual. And as I said before, it is usually after I prove myself in other areas that I open up about the LDs.
"I used to be disgusted, now I try to be amused..."
Elvis Costello
 
CheshireKat
#25 Print Post
Posted on December 25 2009 12:49 AM
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I second (or rather, third?) what Rottie and Blamo said - I couldn't pass for normal even without my LD, so it's not like having dyscalculia is the one thing that makes me feel like the black sheep of the group. If it wasn't having a LD, it would be something else. When you're one of the tallest, skinniest kids in your class, red headed, freckles, glasses, braces, uncoordinated... really, having an LD was not the biggest of my concerns. Fortunately I "grew into" my knees and elbows, but I still stand out whether or not I try to so having dyscalculia is certainly not my defining factor.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
twistedxkiss
#26 Print Post
Posted on December 25 2009 07:13 PM
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"To the person that was outed in college, I was in an Anthropology class when the professor asked me a simple math subtraction question in front of the class and I just could not get it, talk about embarrassment ,so I dropped the next day.
The professor was an older woman so I think she has passed away by now,so I never got a chance to go back and tell her off. "

I was called out by a student in a college class once, we had taken a little mock citizenship test for fun in a poli sci class to see if we could, theoretically, pass the citizenship test. We had to calculate our own scores and each question was worth a third of a point, which was way too hard for me and I screwed up the calculation and apparently put down a score next to my name on the sheet that wasn't possible in increments of three. Someone was like, "who is jill!? what an idiot, you can't put *X*, that isn't even a possible score!" So the whole class went quiet and I informed him that I have dyscalculia and he had just made much more of a fool of himself than I did. I was pretty upset about it, but in the end I believe what I said.
 
saruna
#27 Print Post
Posted on December 26 2009 04:00 AM
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Sim and Twisted:
Thanks for sharing your experiences of being outed. It bothers me that this sort of thing is happening to other people. Maybe if we continue to educate people about learning disabilities, there will be a lot less of this sort of thing.

My new college has a really strict policy on disclosure which is great. They tell professors that under NO circumstances are they allowed to identify a particular student as having a disability. I've been asked mathematical questions in non-math classes before and I always just say that I don't know the answer. I wait for class to end and then I speak to the professor if I feel that it's necessary.

The best kind of advocacy is self advocacy. It can be scary to defend yourself but I've found that it's really helped me.
 
CheshireKat
#28 Print Post
Posted on December 26 2009 04:38 AM
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Talking about being "outed" in front of a large group... when I was in 6th grade math I was working on a math worksheet when my teacher came over and asked me why I wasn't doing my division in long-hand. I quietly told her it was because I didn't know how to do division long-hand.

She made a HUGE deal about it, and dragged me up to the white board in front of everyone so she could "teach" me long division. I had to stand up there, shame-faced, while the entire class watched and laughed as she made me struggle through several long division problems in front of everybody. Finally she let me go sit down after making a complete fool out of me, and to this day I do all of my division long-hand now because I think I had the short-hand division traumatized out of me. Shame too, because I was a lot better at doing it short-hand.

The funny thing is that I am friends with that teacher on Facebook. I have contemplated telling her about how traumatic that was for me, but I decided to just put the past behind me and leave it be. What good would it do to make her feel bad about what she did, not knowing I had a math learning disability? She's a really nice woman, she just made a mistake.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
saruna
#29 Print Post
Posted on December 26 2009 07:13 AM
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CheshireKat:
Is she still teaching? If there is a chance that she still has the same attitude and could be traumatizing other children, then I think that you should tell her. The more people that we educate, the better things will become for others with LDs.

And funnily enough, I don't know the difference between long division and short division. O.o I'm not sure what that is or which way I've been doing it. All I can remember is that there are a LOT of steps involved.

After I was diagnosed, I wrote a letter to my high school counselor and politely informed her of the existence of dyscalculia. She wrote back saying that she had never heard of it before and that she was going to get some materials on LDs to better educate herself.
 
RottieWoman
#30 Print Post
Posted on December 26 2009 06:49 PM
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Saruna,
I did that, too - actually saw my fav. high school math teacher for Pre-and Basic Algebra - and explained all about it! Did that my second year of college. I routinely visited most of my high school teachers and I was excited to be able to tell her.
Also told my previous homeroom teacher that I had all through high school-that was especially significant because she was also one of two LD teachers in the school when I was there. I knew that too but never asked her about it at time.
 
twistedxkiss
#31 Print Post
Posted on December 26 2009 07:31 PM
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I have messaged every math teacher I have ever had and told them about dyscalculia. All but one, incidentally the worst math teacher I ever had-- she stopped giving me assignments and tests because she felt it was a waste of paper, were really interested and that was how I got connected with the Detroit Area Council for Teachers of Mathematics, which turned out to be huge for educating teachers about dyscalculia.
 
CheshireKat
#32 Print Post
Posted on December 26 2009 08:36 PM
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Saruna - No, she is now a stay-at-home mom (with an extremely adorable son). She was a good teacher overall, I think she may have just been having a bad day or something because that was out of character for her. I just remember it very vividly because her "bad day" became one of my worst!
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
Math_Sucks
#33 Print Post
Posted on January 13 2010 11:27 PM
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Most people who know me, know I'm dyscalculic. Its not something I want to hide.
 
RottieWoman
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Posted on January 13 2010 11:42 PM
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with the exception of job interviews, Math-Sucks, I tend to feel the same way-
 
FeatherQuill
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Posted on January 14 2010 01:16 PM
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I've never understood scare tatics ie I'll pick those without their hands up or make you come to the front. I use to put my hand up without a blues clue what the answer was but would end up being chosen if the first person couldn't answer anyway Frown
 
angkor
#36 Print Post
Posted on October 05 2010 10:31 PM
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I believe it's important to let people know about this LD. I tell anyone whenever the subject of math arises.

As with others here, I was repeatedly humiliated by teachers during math lessons. Made fun of, singled out. Hurtful behavior by educators from elementary on up whom you'd think should know better. My HS geometry teacher got so exasperated with me that he picked up my books and papers from my desk and hurled them into the trash can and told me I was fit for nothing better than becoming a farm worker. My HS chemistry teacher told me I was "not bright enough" and advised me to quit. I subsequently proved myself in college and my career. Hopefully, kids these days don't have to endure the indignities I and others had to endure.
Edited by angkor on October 05 2010 10:33 PM
 
dandy22
#37 Print Post
Posted on October 05 2010 10:48 PM
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I never tell anyone, I'm afraid people will think less of me or try to take advantage of me and try to screw me over. Only my parents know, and we NEVER talk about it. They think that if they ignore it and I just "try" to be better it will go away. As for everyone else, my brother, boyfriend and best friend dont even know. I think that the fewer people who know, the better.
Equations are the devil's sentences. -Stephen Colbert
 
RottieWoman
#38 Print Post
Posted on October 06 2010 12:20 AM
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my mom doesn't want to know more about it and doesn't believe it, but otherwise I'm very open and will tell people. If I want or need accommodations, that's the only way I'll get 'em. I also like to share in case it may help someone else.
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on October 06 2010 12:53 AM
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Dandy - I LOVE your signature quote, first of all. Stephen Colbert is a funny guy, and that is pretty hilarious. But anyway, on to what I was going to say... if somebody is going to judge you because you have a learning disability, then they are not worth having in your life, period. I don't think you should keep dyscalculia a secret solely because you are afraid of people judging you or trying to take advantage of you. If someone wants to judge you for having dyscalculia, then their loss, because they are losing the opportunity to get to know a great person. I refuse to allow people like that to be a part of my life, if they are going to negatively judge the less perfect parts of me then they don't need to be around me.

I am quite sure that your extended family, friends, and boyfriend are not going to think any less of you for having an LD. When I told my friends, their first reaction was surprise ("What, you have a learning disability? You seem so smart!") Then once I explained it to them, they went from shock to, "Oh yeah, well, that makes total sense now that you explain it." Mostly people judge because they are ignorant about what a learning disability really is... once they learn the facts about it, it's not a big deal at all.

Angkor - Wow, it sounds like you had it really rough from a lot of your teachers. I am glad that you were able to prove them wrong by succeeding in your life, both academically and socially. It's like the old saying goes, "Success is the best form of revenge."
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
Pirullinen
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Posted on October 14 2010 01:34 PM
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My family and friends know, however, I'm not officially diagnosed because the government in Denmark won't recognize dyscalculia as an actual problem. But there never really been any doubt about whether I have dyscalculia or not.
At my last job interview, I briefly mentioned that I wasn't the best at math in the world. I didn't say that I have no clue how to solve basic math problems. Anyway, I still got the job and I've worked in several shops and never had any problem with the register.

Usually I never tell strangers that I have this problem - simply because they think I'm just an attention seeker if I do. No one takes that sort of thing seriously when they don't really know you and haven't witnessed you struggle to figure out what 3 + 5 is.

How do you tell someone and make them believe that you're being sincere though??
Edited by Pirullinen on October 14 2010 03:13 PM
 
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