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Learning time and tables
mmonty2
#1 Print Post
Posted on November 29 2010 05:35 AM
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Hello

I am a mother a a dearest girl of 8 who has dyscalculia and working memory problems. She is right now learning the time and I am desesperatly looking at ways to help her. Any help out there?
I am also looking for ways to teach her the multiplication tables, any idea where I can get this kind of help?
Thanks!
Edited by mmonty2 on November 29 2010 05:35 AM
 
justfoundout
#2 Print Post
Posted on November 29 2010 01:56 PM
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11/29/10
Dear mmonty2,
I've seen other forum members talk about specifically those issues. Maybe I can do some 'word searches' and find those Threads for you. If so, I'll come back and post it here on this Thread. I'm an adult dyscalculic.

Something that might 'help us help you' would be to know what country you are in, and if you don't mind, what State you live in if you are in the US. This is an international forum, and some websites don't work well for those in other countries, even when they are 'free'. Also, the educational terminology is different, which can be 'off putting' when you have a specific educational goal.

Nice to meet you. Welcome to the forum - jus'
Edited by justfoundout on November 29 2010 02:16 PM
 
justfoundout
#3 Print Post
Posted on November 29 2010 02:10 PM
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11/29/10
Dear mmonty2,
Here's what I've found in these few minutes of 'searches'. These don't contain the 'help' that you've asked for,... just the comments of other adults on how those issues have affected their lives. - jus'

http://dyscalculi...post_30064
mommyto3’s Thread, about times tables. Please note Geoff’s (eoffg) post, too, as he has extensive knowledge of LD’s and is one of our Admin here on this forum.

http://dyscalculi...post_29694
Tigerfeet's Thread about telling time.
Edited by justfoundout on November 29 2010 02:15 PM
 
CheshireKat
#4 Print Post
Posted on November 29 2010 02:19 PM
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Hey mmonty, I'm Kat, welcome to the forum! Something that helped me when it came to learning times tables was to be able to see it visually. Understanding the concept of what it means to multiply across the board like that is half the battle. If your daughter doesn't understand what is actually happening (that when you multiply 3 x 4, you are creating four "groups" of 3 and counting them all up) she will never be able to really get times tables.

Try using something very tactile, like M&Ms or Skittles (which have the added benefit of also being a tasty reward for having worked hard). Write out a multiplication problem from her times tables... keeping with the example above, use 3x4. Ask her to show you what it means. If she can't, then show her. Create four groups of three pieces of candy, and show her that 3x4 basically means the number 3, four times. Have her add them up and give you the answer.

Now show her 4x3, which is the same but grouped in a different way. Being able to touch the pieces and manipulate them may help her to understand what is going on in space - that you have 12 candies both ways, they are just grouped differently. One is 4 groups of 3, the other is 3 groups of 4. She should be able to figure that out more easily with a visual and tactile representation (the candies) than just by staring at the paper. That is what helped me, anyway, and I have also used this when tutoring children about her age in the past, two of whom I suspect were dyscalculic.

Once you know that she understands what is going on, it's really just a matter of rote memorization. Let her pick out some flash cards that she likes, and set aside time in the afternoon after school or in the evening after dinner and homework to do the flashcards with her. Reward her for taking the initiative to do them herself if she does, and even if she doesn't, give her some kind of reward for successfully completing say, 10 cards. She doesn't have to go through the whole pack every night, just make sure she's doing SOMETHING with them every night, even if it's only a few cards a night. The more she sees them, the more easily she will start to memorize them. It's important that she understands what multiplication is, which is what the M&Ms above are for, but the honest truth is that times tables are mostly just memorization, which takes time.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
Kestrel6
#5 Print Post
Posted on November 29 2010 06:10 PM
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(wry smile) the only thing that eventually drove *some* of the times tables into my brain was Multiplication Rock on television. Hopefully those are available on video or something.
Blessed are the PURR in heart!
 
http://twicetoldtails.googlepages.com
Sockcat25
#6 Print Post
Posted on November 29 2010 10:44 PM
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Yes, music really does help. When I was younger I memorized the times tables by putting them to music. Granted, they still confused me on paper, but at least I can still remember that seven-time-six equals forty-two. Smile
 
Velvetrose
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Posted on December 04 2010 10:01 PM
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I'm 51 yrs old and I still don't know them...I know that isn't much help for youFrown

The only way I can multiply is by doing some quick addition on my fingers.

I don't have problems telling time...just figuring out things like: IF I am doing a 30 min massage (yes I am a massage therapist) and I started at 1:23...I should be done by ?

Again my only advice is quick finger counting.
Edited by Velvetrose on December 04 2010 10:40 PM
"An Ye Harm None, Do What Ye Will"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Ever Mind The Rule Of Three
Three Times Your Acts Return To Thee
This Lesson Well, Thou Must Learn
Thou Only Gets What Thee Dost Earn"
 
RottieWoman
#8 Print Post
Posted on December 04 2010 10:35 PM
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I have problems with them too, though that wasn't one of my weakest areas mathematically. Though still have to think about them if asked.
 
squeakymonster
#9 Print Post
Posted on December 04 2010 11:18 PM
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Arg!!! I still don't know most of mine. I know the "easy" ones: 2's, 5's, 10's, 11's, and some 3's and 4's, and I can figure out my 9's, but the rest of them? Excuse me while I go bang my head against a wall! I use my fingers and count up or down from the closest one I know or can figure out quickly, or have to do a visual thing, like drawing it out (which can take forever), or arranging objects (again, takes forever).

I guess that's not much help, and probably not the encouraging answer you were looking for, sorry. Sad It sounds like if you want to help your daughter, better stock up on some eatables and put bubble wrap up on the walls, because those tables are NOT easy!
I'm NOT lost, I'm just taking the scenic rout!
 
NinjaYanni
#10 Print Post
Posted on December 04 2010 11:37 PM
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hey mmonty,

something that helped me learn my 3's (multiplication facts) was a song we learned in 3rd grade at my elementary school. I don't remember the song, but it had a lot of rhymes in it, maybe there's some curriculum with math songs?
 
Velvetrose
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Posted on December 04 2010 11:50 PM
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you could check out Schoolhouse Rock on YouTube...
"An Ye Harm None, Do What Ye Will"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Ever Mind The Rule Of Three
Three Times Your Acts Return To Thee
This Lesson Well, Thou Must Learn
Thou Only Gets What Thee Dost Earn"
 
RottieWoman
#12 Print Post
Posted on December 04 2010 11:54 PM
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yeah, I remember that Schoolhouse Rock, Velvet!

and....Merry Meet....
best wishes for you as the Wheel turns-
 
CheshireKat
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Posted on December 05 2010 03:12 PM
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Ninja, I used a song to learn my 3's times tables too as a kid. The song went like, "Three, six, nine, twelve, fifteen wheels go round and round! Eighteen, twenty-one, twenty-four, twenty-seven, that's how many wheels I've found." The song is apparently about wheels on a bus, or at least that's the visual I've always had when I sung the song. Even though it didn't make a whole lot of sense, it was catchy and it helped me remember how to multiply 3 all the way through 9.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
internationalmama
#14 Print Post
Posted on December 05 2010 05:23 PM
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Hi and welcome,
Do you want your child to learn the tables or to memorize them? I hope you see the difference, because it is hard to memorize what you donīt understand.
When I was struggling with my daughter I found helpful the links of MisterNumbers in Youtube, eg, the 7īs
http://www.youtub...6oJ5rw9mys
But my daughter is a visual learner and auditive weak, thatīs why the songs donīt help much.
Telling the time is very hard for dyscalculic children, there is 2 aspects: the verbal one (quarter to ten= what is a quarter, etc) and the 24 hours
divided in 60 minutes.
I would go step by step. First the hours till 12 (am and pm), and the halves. How can she tell the hour if she has problems with the tables? She needs to understand the 5īs and then be able to see the 5 minutes difference.


 
Aminididi
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Posted on March 01 2012 01:47 AM
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Hey
Well, its really awesome that you are teaching your 8 year old personally. When we learned time in school, everyone else worked it out quickly, but i never understood it, and i still have trouble reading analog clocks, and no on ever noticed. I think you should just keep explaining it to her. Shell understand eventually Smile
Hello...

Goodbye...
 
RottieWoman
#16 Print Post
Posted on March 06 2012 03:18 PM
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"no one ever noticed...." sooooo familiar-
 
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