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Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





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Info for UK dyscalculics
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#1 Print Post
Posted on July 05 2006 04:27 PM
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Hi all

Just got back from seeing my doctor. While i was there i asked if he could refer me to someone to get tested for dyscalculia. Unfortunately it seems the NHS is a bit crap when it comes to LD's etc etc and there were no psychology units or anything he could refer me to.

He did say that there is a Dyslexia Centre in Bath (for those of you in the South West) and he reckoned they could probably test me, but of course it wouldn't be free.

Just thought i would post this info for everyone in the UK. It looks like we're going to have to educate the NHS!
Anyone have any ideas on how we could start to do this?Smile


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Nicola
#2 Print Post
Posted on July 05 2006 08:52 PM
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Hi Bubble!

I spoke to my doc about getting a referral for being tested a couple of months back and hit the same problem you did - if you're an adult, getting tested for an LD on the NHS is a real problem. She did contact the Scottish Dyselxia West society but they never got back to her. I contacted the Dyslexia Scotland group and they will test, but it costs about 300 - pretty prohibitive. The NHS can't go any further than that - there are no psychologists in my area to help so that, really, was that.

It does seem unfair that you can get tested for just about everything else on the NHS, but getting a referral to get tested for dyscalculia is nigh-on impossible.

The only positive thing was that at least my doc had heard of the condition so I didn't have to explain it to her, but she felt as helpless as I did at not being able to actually DO anything about it.

ValP on this forum has suggested setting up a British Dyscalculia society - there's a forum category you might want to have a look at if you haven't already - we can see about putting our heads together.

I think the starting point really has to come from us - to stand up and not be ashamed of it (and I'm pointing the finger at me here) and that it's something that really DOES have to be addressed for exactly the same reasons as people with dyslexia, and to add our voices to those who have identified the condition and those who seek to address the issue.

Nicola Smile
 
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Posted on July 06 2006 09:46 AM
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Hi Nicola

Thanks for the reply. I did see that thread about starting our own UK dyscalculia society. ValP is in Scotland as well isn't she?

So yeah, we should definitely try to get our heads together on this and sort something out.

I understand what you mean perfectly, sometimes it seems such a daunting task. My doctor had heard of dyscalculia vaguely so I suppose the medical world is aware of it, just!

I'm going to have a look at ValP's thread again to see if anyone has added anything. Maybe we could get eachother's email addresses? For the purposes of this only of course.

I'm thinking hard about where to start!! Smile
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Laura
#4 Print Post
Posted on December 09 2006 05:16 PM
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Hi, i too went to my doctors to see about screenings for dyslexia and dyscalculia. Like both of you my doctor said its a hell of alot easier getting a diagnosis when your a kid but the NHS doesnt do adults. Which is a piece of nonsense as what the hell are we ment to do???
Anyway my doctor said check out dyslexia websites which i did. I know i am not dyslexic however i do have half of the symptoms. But i think or i would persume this would have been caught at school since i was in the Learning Support base most of the time?? I did try DORE though and friends of mines says its a con, others dont know. My doctor hadent even heard of DORE so who knows. I did have a meeting with the guy that does my area and he talked me through what i would be doing and how much it costs etc. Too much money i feel to possibly waste as who knows if you are dyslexic, dyscalcic or even dyspraxic. Anyway i didnt go through with it and i dont regret it i am just annoyed that there is support from the NHS- tell me again why we pay taxes?????
 
A Little Horror
#5 Print Post
Posted on December 29 2006 07:45 PM
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NHS -pfft! I hate that my money seems to go towards not helping me at all. I'm also epileptic, I see my neurologist every 6 months, it's impossible to get appointmenst closer together. My local doctors is just as bad. There is a waiting list of 1 week unless (Surely you would be well by the time your appointment is due?!?!) it is an actual emergency that is obvious, however, for the most part if that happens they pass the buck and send you to the hospital where you have to wait for at least 5 hours before you are seen -it's a joke!

I used to feel sorry for Americans for having to pay for their healthcare, but if it means better service and less time wasters then I think I agree with the idea. The NHS has got so bad recently. An older person I know broke their leg, while in hospital they contracted MRSA and died -of an 'unrelated illness' of course. It's scary stuff.

Totally off topic but I figured while us Brits are ranting about the NHS I may as well join in!
Edited by A Little Horror on December 29 2006 07:49 PM
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#6 Print Post
Posted on December 29 2006 09:53 PM
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I am an NHS GP and I have to say that whilst it is widely known that britain has the best doctors as regards diagnosing cases, we have absolutely crap resources to deal with people. I am part time and thank god. If i was full time I would crack up in despair- 14 months to see a psycologist in my area!!! 10 months if you are suicidal. Actually you can see a gp in 24 hours and a nurse in 48 hours -we have to do that to hit a target and then we get points and points mean money. If you specify the gp then you will probably have to wait longer. also you would not believe the number of computer forms I have to fill in...you may have YOUR agenda to discuss with the doctor but we have a totally different agenda...we want to do your smear test, check your asthma,review your medication,check your blood pressure,ask if you smoke, cholesterol oh yes and the latest is check your ethnic status. All in7-10 minutes. NIGHTMARE .FINISHED DOCTOR BASHING -GOOD!
LET'S ATTACK THE PSYCHIATRISTS INSTEAD . I once referred a young adult to a psychiatrist with the request that he review him for a possible diagnosis of adult ADHD (an american doctor once suggested it tohim). He has intelligent professional parents and should have done well.He told me he always clowned around at school and never could concentrate or achieve anything. Life was in a fog and he eventually turned to drugsto mask his fidgeting and thinking.He has been in and out of rehab and prison. He asked for ritalin as he really wanted to start again and believed he had adhd. Well you can't prescribe ritalin as a gp without psychiatry initiation and I felt out of my depth but felt he deserved a chance. I refered him . NB I am not a constant referrer and only ask for specialist help when needed. I was so ashamed of the reply from the psych that I threw the letter in the bin- he wrote that it was the worst refrral he had had in years and the man was a drug addict.
In England there are only 2 centres for diagnosing adhd in adults so the psych didn't want to bother. I was so offended by that reply- both for the patient and for the lack of respect to me. BUT MY POINT IS THAT DYSCALCULICS HAVE A VERY HARD FIGHT AND THEY SHOULD TAKE ADVICE AND LEARN FROM THOSE WHO HAVE WALKED THE PATH BEFORE THEM eg the adhd adults and fibromyalgia sufferers and M.E. patients AS THERE ARE MANY OLD FASHIONED SPECIALISTS WHO WILL NOT ACCEPT NEW DIAGNOSES WITHOUT MUCH PERSUASION
Edited by dawn on December 29 2006 10:06 PM
 
littlelostkitten
#7 Print Post
Posted on December 29 2006 11:51 PM
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it does seem that the best way to get help with this is through academic institutions. i'm at uni and it was only because of a stray comment made to a lecturer that things started getting looked into. i've been struggling on and off with depression, and so has my sister. when she asked her doc to be refered to a counsellor he gave her 6 months of drugs, saying it was a faster solution. i suppose if there was a quick fix for dyscalculia then the nhs would be more forthcoming.

maybe we should resort to crime, stealing house numbers and changing clocks...? crooks always seem to get loads of help...
Edited by littlelostkitten on December 29 2006 11:53 PM
 
littlelostkitten
#8 Print Post
Posted on December 30 2006 12:28 AM
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just googling around, looking for more info. here's a few links to do with getting diagnosed in the uk...

http://www.pbs.or...trats.html

http://www.dyscal...assessment

http://ddig.lboro...links.html

Edited by eoffg on December 30 2006 04:26 AM
 
ert
#9 Print Post
Posted on December 30 2006 12:30 AM
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littlelostkitten wrote:
maybe we should resort to crime, stealing house numbers and changing clocks...? crooks always seem to get loads of help...


One might think that they became "crooks" because the system (aka GPA's etc.) didn't help them before they turned to these ways of living life. Just think about the fact that 80% of the people in American prisons have learning disabilities. Don't know the UK stats.

Off topic, sorry Smile
 
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#10 Print Post
Posted on December 30 2006 04:25 AM
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The best help for adult Dyslexics in the UK, is provided in the UK Prisons.
Also its Free.
Could be hope for Dyscalculics as well?Pfft
 
littlelostkitten
#11 Print Post
Posted on December 30 2006 05:15 PM
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you think that maybe because they're locked up with nowhere to go that they have nothing else better to do than psyche evaluations for lds?

i can understand an undiagnosed dyslexic eventually ending up with a life of crime, but unless it's cheating on taxes or stealing house numbers i don't see my sad lack of mathematical ability leading me to a stint behind bars...

i suppose the difference is whether you look at it as a limitation or as a quest for alternative learning. if you use it as an excuse, then you're only making it worse for yourself.
Edited by littlelostkitten on December 30 2006 05:17 PM
 
dawn
#12 Print Post
Posted on January 01 2007 08:14 PM
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sorry but there is no room in Englands prison system so you may have to commit a really heinous crime to get in for your evaluation.
 
pinkymoo
#13 Print Post
Posted on June 14 2008 12:09 AM
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littlelostkitten wrote:
you think that maybe because they're locked up with nowhere to go that they have nothing else better to do than psyche evaluations for lds?

i can understand an undiagnosed dyslexic eventually ending up with a life of crime, but unless it's cheating on taxes or stealing house numbers i don't see my sad lack of mathematical ability leading me to a stint behind bars...

i suppose the difference is whether you look at it as a limitation or as a quest for alternative learning. if you use it as an excuse, then you're only making it worse for yourself.


Did you not hear the story about the dyscalculic bank robbers?

It was an inside job. One of them was posing as a cashier only they couldn't remember the pin code to the safe under the time limit before the cops arrived and when they tried to escape they couldn't remember where they'd left the getaway car! Pfft


[small]A cheap joke I know but if I can't laugh at my dyscalculia I might cry!Sad[/small]

In all honesty it says something about the U.K that you have to resort to crime to get noticed and even then it's not guarenteed to work because our prisions are overflowing so they might just slap you on the wrist and let you walk free. Maybe if they brought in more testing and help then they wouldn't have overflowing prisions!
 
Lostinspatial
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Posted on June 14 2008 03:29 AM
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lol, the only way that would be better Pinky Moo is if they had name/place recognition issues & stopped at the police station to ask for directions! Smile
 
RacheyB
#15 Print Post
Posted on July 22 2008 11:52 PM
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Mannn, i cant believe how little support there is in diagnosis. If the government is so concerned about education, it would surely be in their interest to look into reasons for anything holding people back in their learning.
Maths is apparently such a big thing (although i cant see what the big fuss is around it lol, its the most useless subject ever if u ask me) they should surely take an interest in any possibility of a disability in it.
There needs to be some funding into it, some research and more people aware
 
justfoundout
#16 Print Post
Posted on July 23 2008 01:45 AM
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7/22/08
Dear RacheyB,
I'm amazed at how fast you 'caught on'. When I tried to find testing facilities for you earlier today, what went on inside my head was exactly what you just got through posting. It looked so bad, so pitiful, that I didn't even want to tell you how disappointed I was. I did the best I could, you know I did. Hope to talk to you some more. See ya'.
justfound out
 
bobby
#17 Print Post
Posted on August 11 2008 02:58 PM
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Out of curiosity why are people wanting to be diagnosed? Obv education wise it is helpful information to have so that others know how to best support your studies but other than that why? I can understand that it can be a sense of relief to know it is a learning difficulty that is the problem not something else but are the benefits purely psychological? I was diagnosed around May time and yeh it is interesting but its not affected any other part of my life, i put it on job application forms to spread the word (doing my part! Wink ) but it is not as though i'll ever get any accomodation for it. If anything it will just hinder my chances of getting a job! although i hope not.
The NHS is in a poor state atm, back in the 1950s there weren't as many identifiable illnesses/diseases/conditions, people now live longer, there are now more areas of research and treatment to fund. We could always put our taxes up? Personally i don't think it is the NHS fault one bit, i see it as the downfall of our education system. All these targets that must be attained, pressure on teachers, so little resources for them to work with. I wonder that if i HAD been diagnosed as dyslexic and dyscaculic at school if it would have made a difference back then...i was attaining well at school despite all this through sher (how to you spell that shere? sh-ear - that is how it is prounonced i think?!) hard work, i think they would have looked at me and said 'well, she's coping, lets give the resources to someone needing it more'....and they'd probably be right in making that decision.
Sorry for the rant....got a bit carried away there me thinks! Grin
 
Lostinspatial
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Posted on August 11 2008 03:33 PM
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Mencap has been mentioned on the site before as an organization in the UK which helps with diagnosis referrals, etc. Here's a link to the list of local Mencap groups. Though I'm in the USA so I have no idea how helpful, etc. they are:

http://www.mencap...sp?id=1835

Bobby,

Confirmation/validation is a big part of why people want to get diagnosed. The woman I met with as part of my initial screening said I should get tested so I have documentation in case I ever run into problems in the workplace. I'm getting tested next month.
 
justfoundout
#19 Print Post
Posted on August 12 2008 01:55 AM
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8/11/08
Dear Bobby and Lisa_,

Our member, Cem, wrote on another Thread:
"Men cap is for mentally handicapped childrn and adults which my son is not, however i am that desperate that i will give anything a go."

I took a look at the photos, and it seems that Cem is correct. I had searched everywhere, once, to find something in the UK to help a member, and there seemed to be almost nothing.

Bobby, in my own case, I wanted to be professionally diagnosed with dyscalculia, because, due to my dyscalculia, I have not been able to reach the level of math necessary to complete my 2-year college degree. In Texas, some colleges are considerate enough to allow a student with dyscalculia to replace the Math requirement with something else that shows that he/she can reason logically. (I've forgotten the term that colleges use for this. Help me out, Lisa_.) But the only way that a student can get those Math credits 'waived' is to bring the college a professional report written on the basis of a battery of tests that show dyscalculia. This is what I wanted done in my case.

But, it turns out that the dyscalculia tests are more easily 'read' when a child or teenager is being tested than when it is an adult. Adults have already figured out 'ways around' the dyscalculia, so it's more difficult for the test to determine if there is dyscalculia or not. In my own case, the test didn't 'see' my dyscalculia. Now, I'm having to either get re-tested or transfer to a different college which has no math requirement. I'll have to "do over" a lot of the work that I've already done when I transfer.

Others want the diagnosis so that the school or college will provide more time for taking a test, someone to be a 'note taker', or so they can have a private tutor.

The dyscalculia test makes a big difference to those who are still in school. And Lisa_ mentions a good reason for those who already have a professional career, too.
justfoundout
Edited by justfoundout on August 12 2008 02:01 AM
 
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