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Chess & Card games = ?!? Confusion
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#1 Print Post
Posted on June 07 2011 10:00 PM
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All my life i have never been able to play chess. I always forgot what piece is what and of course the rules that govern each piece. Not to mention that you have to plan your moves ahead of time and see the outcome. Checkers on the other hand i can play because i find it much easier and simplified.

The only card game i can play is goldfish. Any poker game i have an extremely difficult time playing. I don't get it period. You can explain it to me 1000 times and i won't get it, so needless to say i'm not a big fan of card games.

Anyone else?
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ĪThe eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehendĪ
 
heathermomster
#2 Print Post
Posted on June 07 2011 10:43 PM
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My child with dyscalculia loves to play Uno, Connect Four, Shut the Box, and Yahtzee. He can play 5 man draw (I'm not exactly sure what that means...) and says that it is Okay. He forgets the rules at times, but plays with his very lenient and patient father.

We've played Checkers in the past. DS loves Checkers; however, no chess.
Edited by heathermomster on June 07 2011 10:47 PM
 
CheshireKat
#3 Print Post
Posted on June 08 2011 02:00 AM
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I actually have no problem with rules to games, so board and card games are not an issue for me. In fact, I carry a deck of cards around in my purse just in case I ever get stuck with a group of friends somewhere and we need some entertainment.

My cousin taught me how to play chess when I was about 9, and I have always enjoyed it, but I am not a very good chess player because I cannot strategize. That requires way more thinking ahead and mental manipulation than I can do - I have a hard time "seeing" the board in my head several moves ahead of time, I just can't hold the mental image, so it's hard for me to think, "Well if I move there, they will move here, and then I can move there." I understand strategy, I just can't mentally see it, so I rarely think ahead when I'm playing chess and that is kind of a requirement for being a good chess player.

On the other hand, I will whip everyone when it comes to "speed chess." In high school my AP English teacher loved to play chess, and he kept a chess board in his classroom if anyone wanted to play him before class or during lunch. Sometimes I would play him and we would play two games - the first game would be a regular, untimed game, and he always beat me soundly.

The second game, though, would be a "speed chess" game with a 5 second cap per move. You HAD to move in 5 seconds or less, that was the rule. I am significantly better at playing speed chess than regular chess, because I am better at thinking on my feet than most people. So in those games whatever strategical advantage he had over me in regular chess was lost, and I got to play to my own strength, which is thinking faster.
"The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
 
justfoundout
#4 Print Post
Posted on June 08 2011 02:32 AM
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6/7/11
I'm wondering, Kat, if it was just your 'thinking faster' that gave you an advantage, or maybe you had stronger, more accurate intuition? - jus'
 
dandy22
#5 Print Post
Posted on June 08 2011 03:33 AM
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I always believed that chess was for nerds or rich prep school kids who have nothing better to do with their friday night. I've never been able to play chess, so maybe that was just something I told myself to make me feel better about it.
I've never understood checkers or very many card/board games either. Whenever someone invites me to play a game with them, I usually decline to save myyself the embarrassment. When I do play I feel really nervous and stressed out. I just don't get it, but there are way worse things in the world to be.
Equations are the devil's sentences. -Stephen Colbert
 
Mohinga
#6 Print Post
Posted on June 08 2011 06:56 AM
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Chess and I never really got along.
The fact that the chess pieces move in different patterns is more than enough to confuse me and remembering that as well as trying to play a game of chess would never ever succeed.
I'm a violin so stop trying to make me sound like a piano!!

Dyscalculia doesn't bother me as much as all the nasty accessories that came with it
 
RottieWoman
#7 Print Post
Posted on June 08 2011 03:20 PM
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I remember as a kid playing checkers with my dad and card games like Soitaire, Go Fish, War and others with my mom or with my friends. I really liked those. Also really liked Rummy and one of my friends and I would play Uno for hours.
Never learned chess and after I met my then-boyfriend <now husband> who really like chess <for fun, not compete> , I've tried to learn it at different times and it's always been difficult.
 
Winter Rose
#8 Print Post
Posted on June 08 2011 07:03 PM
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I can play chess, but I'm not great at it. Just okay, I suppose. I do always forget the rules, but then again it's not like I play it that often.
I'm average to below average when it comes to card games. And strategy just isn't my forte.

The games rules that are the most challenging for me are RPGs such as D&D and White Wolf. I'm a gamer nerd and I love to play RPGs, but no matter how long I have played (15+ years at this point) I constantly need to be reminded about the rules and systematics (which, granted, can be rather complex depending on the game) which just have never stuck for me. I usually need to keep a rule book or cheat sheet nearby to help me out. All the same I love them.
 
darthlaurie
#9 Print Post
Posted on June 24 2011 09:12 PM
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Location: Salt Lake City, UT
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I wasn't a huge fan of games until my partner introduced me to Eurogames. These games are often cooperative games (involves some teamwork to get what you want) with nice game pieces or wood or nice tiles. There are some games I love even if I mostly lose and other games I lose and hate. There's even one game I dislike but more often than not I end up winning.
I know that with at least some of the games that I dislike it's because they deal with that form of mathematical logic that I really don't have; Robo Rally is a fine example. You're supposed to move your robot (no it's not battery powered or exciting) around the board. Certain spaces on the board have areas that move your robot forward or backward or do something else. Oh, and there's a timer so you have to figure this all out in under a minute. Let's just say my robot continually got zapped by lasers and moved in a circle the whole game. Yeah, pretty much sucked. Naturally it's a game my partner LOVES....he plays it with co-workers at lunch. Maybe I'm still disappointed that there aren't real little robots and cool lasers and moving parts on the board as well.

There are other games I love: Ticket to Ride, Power Grid, Alahambra, Bohnanza, Carcassonne, Mystery of the Abbey, and Dominion. Even if some of them are a bit challenging (Mystery of the Abbey is like Clue on steroids), they have something about them that makes them enjoyable.
I suspect a lot of these Eurogames could be useful in developing some of those skills we have a hard time with. I need to learn more about dyscalculia and digest some information to figure out some of the games that might be most useful for people like us. I've seen first hand how they can help kids learn all sorts of skills. Boardgamegeek.com is a terrific resource if you're curious about this type of game (and if you like chess a lot of these games will be enjoyable-- and if you don't like chess, you'll still find games you can enjoy).
One game that is particularly intriguing is Dominion and its expansions. Basically you select ten categories of cards that you can use to gain prestige points and gold. I'm usually not very good at this game, but if we use certain decks I'll crush the competition...but some parts of the game-- how to make the most out of a turn usually takes me a long time to grasp.
 
justfoundout
#10 Print Post
Posted on June 25 2011 04:55 PM
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Location: Texas USA
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6/25/11
I used to be good at the old Clue game. Once when we played partners (I've forgotten,... did you always have a partner in that game?), I made a guess, because I knew that I had a 75% chance of being right. But my playing partner, because he wasn't mentally keeping track of the clues, got 'mad' at me for making that guess. He thought that I was just making a stab in the dark, and that I'd probably cause us to loose. He had the funniest, most bewildered look on his face when it turned out I was 'right'. - jus'
 
darthlaurie
#11 Print Post
Posted on June 25 2011 06:15 PM
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Location: Salt Lake City, UT
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Joined: 2011-06-24

I've never played Clue with a partner...I would guess you played it that way to include more people.
We have a terrific game store here called Game Night Games where we buy most of our games. One of the store managers even has a game published called Heavens of Olympus. Another local has a game that could win a big German game award called Spiel des Jahres...it's a fun game called Pastiche. Incidentally, if a game says Spiel des Jahres on it, there's a good chance it's a fun game with a lot of replayability.
 
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