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Do you tell people that you have dyscalculia?





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i'm not so sure i have dyscalculia...
princessa
#1 Print Post
Posted on August 16 2006 06:08 AM
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Location: Manila, Philippines
Posts: 5

Joined: 2006-08-16

hi! i'm new here. uhm... i'm not so sure i have dyscalculia. i just came across it recently because i suck at math (i can't understand algebra and why letters are used instead of numbers. and why people need to learn it.). i thought to myself, "if there's a thing such as dyslexia, there should be something about people with math problems...". And, voila, i looked for it on google and found out that there really is a math dyslexia. i can not understand algebra for the life of me. but, i remember having to study scientific notations in my science subject, and i understood it while i was doing the exercises. but, when i moved on to other lessons, i quickly forgot scientific notations. i have sooooooo many questions about this. hope you can answer them. here are a few.. hehehe.


is there a test that i should take in order for me to really know i have dyscalculia?


is there anyone here from the Philippines?

i've been homeschooled for 8 years now. do you think that's a factor? my mom never really taught me math. and i stopped having a tutor on my 6th year.

and... how do you tell your mom you have a learning disablity?

Edited by princessa on August 16 2006 09:43 AM
 
karalyeva2
#2 Print Post
Posted on August 16 2006 05:20 PM
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Location: No value
Posts: 74

Joined: 2006-08-11

hi Princessa!
Well, let's see--most dyscalculics see numbers as whole things, not amounts, but almost like words, to be memorized. We also tend to have trouble with concepts like music theory, sightreading, etc. It is difficult for us to learn how to tell time, and apparently, according to recent forum threads, we suck at Monopoly. Haha. There is a whole list of symptoms on Dyscalculia.org, and because nobody formally diagnosed me as dyscalculic (though I was diagnosed as having a specific math disability in elementary school--which is pretty much the same thing--just nobody told me it had a name, lol) I diagnosed myself using these symptoms. That is very cool you are from the Philippines! Are you from Manila? My dad lived in the Philippines when he was young, he always talks about it Smile
Lara
 
Erin
#3 Print Post
Posted on August 17 2006 01:02 AM
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Location: Ireland
Posts: 7

Joined: 2006-08-17

Hi. I have just joined the forum. I have been trying to figure out for quite some time why I almost always get dates wrong. I volunteer with a youth organisation and often organise events, which involves sending out information notes including dates etc. No matter how many times I check the calendar I always manage to get one of the dates wrong - the most recent being this afternoon in an email which is what prompted me to go on the internet tonight to try to discover what the problem is. I have been saying for quite some time, by way of apology, that if there was such a thing as 'date dyslexia' then I have it. It is so bad that I have to make a standing joke of it. I never considered I had a significant problem with numbers, albeit that I was no maths genius, but what I am reading tonight brings home the fact that I still do addition by 'mind dots', which have replaced the dots we used to draw on the page to count when learning arithmatic as children. I can do mental arithmetic if I push myself but this is much slower than counting my dots! I always thought this was a laziness on my part but now I think maybe not!
 
princessa
#4 Print Post
Posted on August 17 2006 09:09 AM
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Location: Manila, Philippines
Posts: 5

Joined: 2006-08-16

karalyeva: thanks for that. i've been diagnosing myself too with the information i get from the net. it's been a big help. and when i found this forum, it made me feel alot better to know there are other people like me. Smile oh, yes. i'm from manila. i've been trying to look for stuff about dyscalculia in colleges here in manila since i'll be going to college hopefully next year. but, i don't think they even know about dyscalculia. it's pretty disappointing cuz the only option i see now is to study in the states. hopefully, that won't be the case.
 
eoffg
#5 Print Post
Posted on August 17 2006 10:17 AM
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Location: Australia
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Hi PrincessaPfft,
It seems that we are both in the same time zone, I'm just south of you in Western Australia.
You wrote that Algebra was a real problem for you. Though you never mentioned whether you have difficulties with Arithmetic and Numbers?
I'm asking this as you wrote:"i've been homeschooled for 8 years now. do you think that's a factor? my mom never really taught me math. and i stopped having a tutor on my 6th year."
Where I'm wondering if your difficulty developed when Algebra was introduced to you?
Arithmetic and Algebra are very different, where Arithmetic deals with 'physical quantities'. Whereas Algebra, deals with Conceptual thinking.
Where letters can represent numbers or quantities as you say.
Also multiple operations are involved in a calculation.

It is a major leap from Arithmetic to Algebra and 'conceptual thinking'.
Where given that you say:" i've been homeschooled for 8 years now. do you think that's a factor? my mom never really taught me math. and i stopped having a tutor on my 6th year."
Also that Algebra is introduced in the 7th to 8th year.
I wonder if the 'conceptual thinking' of Algebra was ever properly introduced to you?
Which could be your difficulty?

Though you also wrote that you dont think that the colleges in Manila know anything about Dyscalculia?
So perhaps you can join in with our effort to 'spread the word' about Dyscalculia throughout the world?
Geoff.Pfft
 
ert
#6 Print Post
Posted on August 17 2006 07:53 PM
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Location: Denmark
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princessa - welcome to the forum Smile

It could be a BIG factor that you were never really taught math. Look around for educational psychologists, maybe someone who tests for dysLEXIA, and ask them to help you find someone? Or maybe you have a national learning disabilities association in the Philippines?

Hi Erin, welcome Grin
 
http://www.facebook.com/mettechristoffersen
princessa
#7 Print Post
Posted on August 23 2006 05:00 AM
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Location: Manila, Philippines
Posts: 5

Joined: 2006-08-16

thanks, eoffg!

uhm... actually, i started taking algebra classes earlier this year. i have a tutor for it. we meet once a week and she gives me homework. i get the lessons when she teaches me and explains them to me, but i forget them the following day or i remember just enough to complete a few of the homework exercises then forget how the formulas go.
 
eoffg
#8 Print Post
Posted on August 23 2006 06:26 AM
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Hi PrincessaPfft,
You wrote that: "I get the lessons when she teaches me and explains them to me, but i forget them the following day or i remember just enough to complete a few of the homework exercises then forget how the formulas go."
So a main issue for you, is to be able to remember it?
Where you can use some strategies for this.

One technique that you can use with your tutor. Is after she has explained a lesson, and you have understood it.
Then, turn it around and explain it back to your tutor.
But you need to imagine that you are the tutor, and she is the student.
So you dont just 'tell her', but you have to give her a really good explanation.
Putting it in your own words, and explaining it as if you are the tutor. Helps with saving it in your long term memory.
Also later in the day or early evening. Just take the lesson out and have a look at it for 5 minutes. Where you just recall your explanation, and explain it to yourself.
Then do the same the next day.
The following day, do some of the homework that uses what you learnt.
Two days later, do some more of the homework.
A day or two later, just have a brief look at the lesson and recall your explanation.
Then when your tutor shows up for the next lesson, show her what you remember.
Princessa, maybe you could try this technique for a week.
GeoffPfft
 
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